Quick & Easy Bierocks

Bierocks. Pronounced beer-rocks 🙂 But there is no beer in this recipe, only 8 simple ingredients, and that’s including the salt, pepper and water. As a child, ketchup would’ve HAD to be on that ingredient list. But my how the years have changed. These rolls are too darn delicious just as they are to need any dipping sauce, but I’ll leave that up to you!

Makes: 25 rolls

Ingredients

1 pound lean ground beef

1 pound ground pork sausage

1 medium cabbage, sliced in short strips

1 medium yellow onion, chopped

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pepper

1 cup water

25 frozen yeast dinner roll dough balls

Directions

  1. Proof dough according to directions on package.
  2. Combine and cook the beef and sausage in a large stockpot over medium heat.
  3. Add cabbage, onion, salt, pepper and water to meat for the filling. Cover and let simmer for 30 minutes.
  4. Remove stockpot from heat and drain any excess liquid from the filling.
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  6. When dough is proofed and ready, flatten each ball into a small circle. Place about 1/4 cup of filling in the center of the dough. Wrapping the dough around the filling, pinch the edges to seal tightly. Place the filled dough, seal-side down, on a prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining dough leaving 3 inches of space between rolls.
  7. Bake rolls at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes until golden brown.
  8. Serve warm and enjoy!

Notes

  1. After draining the filling, transfer to a bowl lined with several paper towels. The paper towels will soak up any remaining liquid, making it that much easier to seal the filled dough later.

Corned Beef Hash

CornedBeefHash

When indulging at a local breakfast diner, you can pretty much guarantee either Scott or I will order the corned beef hash topped with fried eggs. Glorious! After our last breakfast date, I decided I needed to attempt a quick-and-easy corned beef hash skillet at home. Using corned beef sliced fresh from the deli saves LOTS of time, so the most effort for this treat is waiting for the skillet to cook, golden brown and crispy.

Makes: 4 servings

 

Ingredients

3 cups potatoes, cubed

1 cup sweet onion, sliced

1 cup red bell pepper, sliced

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon Beef Seasoning

1/2 pound corned beef, chopped thin

4 eggs, prepared any style

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Combine the potatoes, onion, peppers and oil in a large cast iron skillet.
  3. Sprinkle with beef seasoning.
  4.  Fold in corned beef.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes, stirring the mixture once or twice before finished.
  6. Top skillet with eggs.

 

Notes

Eggs with a little ooze are just perfect plopped on top of this skillet. Bursting with flavor and a fantastic pair with the seasoned potatoes and beef. Still, I’m a dietitian and must recommend cooking to 160 degrees for food safety 🙂

Speaking of beef seasoning, check out this recipe from Kids, Cows and Grass. THE BEST, keep it stocked in your pantry. At. All. Times.


Meat the Only Stromboli Recipe You Will Ever Need

In my previous life (a few months ago), I would roll out a pre-made crust from the can to treat my family on pizza night. Our lives forever changed the day I stepped up and experimented with homemade pizza dough. The feeling of molding a perfectly developed dough—irreplaceable. I can’t say that I will never-ever use a can of crust again, but I can say that my family will be completely crushed on that day. Roll-up this hearty, meat-filled Stromboli for a REAL treat this week!

Makes: 10 pieces

Ingredients

For the Dough:

1 cup warm water

2 ¼ teaspoon active dry yeast

3 cups all-purpose flour

½ teaspoon sugar

½ teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons olive oil

Cooking spray

For the Filling:

1 cup marinara sauce

½ pound lean ground beef, cooked

½ pound deli pepperoni, sliced thin

2 cups mozzarella cheese, shredded

¾ teaspoon Italian seasoning, divided

1 tablespoon butter, melted

Directions

  1. Combine the yeast and water. Let set for 5 minutes.
  2. In the large bowl of a stand mixer, combine flour, sugar, salt and olive oil. After 5 minutes, when the yeast is frothy, pour the water over the flour mixture. Using the dough hook, begin mixing the dough. Use a rubber spatula to scrape the sides of the bowl as needed. Knead the dough on medium speed until fully developed. See notes.
  3. Remove the dough from the bowl and form into a ball. Lightly spritz the inside of the bowl with cooking spray and return the ball to the bowl. Lightly spritz the top of the dough with cooking spray as well and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place for 1-2 hours until double in size.
  4. When the dough is ready, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  5. Roll the dough out on a clean surface into a 1 ½ x 2-foot rectangle, about ½ an inch thick.
  6. Spread the marinara evenly across the dough, leaving about 1″ around the edge.
  7. Layer the ground beef, pepperoni and cheese over the marinara sauce and sprinkle with ½ teaspoon seasoning.
  8. Beginning with the shorter side, roll the dough into a log. When rolled entirely, transfer to a greased baking sheet with the crease from the dough tucked under.
  9. Bake at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until a golden crown crust has formed on the top.
  10. Remove the Stromboli from the oven. Spread melted butter across the top and sprinkle with remaining seasoning.
  11. Let set for 5-10 minutes before slicing into 1” pieces for serving.

Notes

Kneading the dough usually takes around 5 minutes. A fun way to test and see if your dough is fully developed is the “windowpane test”. Pull apart a small piece of dough and begin to stretch it between your fingers. When the dough is fully developed, it will thin as it is stretched to create a small window but won’t break apart. That’s when you know that you are ready to rock-and-roll on to the next step!

Pizza dough adapted from the Crazy for Crust recipe, https://www.crazyforcrust.com/the-ultimate-pizza-crust-recipe/.

Alert. Family-friendly recipe here! Get your kids’ (or borrowed nieces and nephews) hands in the dough: measuring, rolling, filling. Fun stuff!

Tell me, what would you pair with Stromboli to build a balanced plate?


A Hungry Cowboy’s Chunky Chili

Ever crunched for time and that special someone asks, “What’s for supper?” Rather than letting yourself begin to boil, may I suggest taking this as-easy-as-it-gets chili to a gentle boil instead? Dump. Dump. Dump. Stir. Enjoy as-is, or pour over chips with cheese and sour cream for a take on the ever-classic chili pie.

Makes: 8-10 servings

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive or canola oil

1 small yellow onion, chopped (about 1 cup)

2 cans chili beans, 15 oz

1 can black beans, 15 oz

1 can diced tomatoes, 15 oz

1-2 cups of meat (chopped brisket, shredded chicken, ground beef, etc.)

1 package chili seasoning, 1.25 ounces (or homemade chili seasoning)

1-2 cups of water

Directions

  1. In a large dutch oven or stockpot, sauté the onion in oil over medium heat for 5 minutes or until cooked through, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add the beans, tomatoes, meat and seasoning to the onions.
  3. Simmer on low heat for an hour.
  4. Add water to thin chili to the desired consistency.

Notes

For a more balanced plate, serve with a fruit or veggie or glass of milk! You could even be a little sneaky and stash some veggies in the chili. So sneaky.

CowboyChili


The Beginning of a Chilly Winter

As I imagine most did, I snuck away from my office for a few days to spend time with friends and family during the holidays. I use the term “friends and family” a little loosely here, for it goes without saying that the cattle are one and the same.

 

Stroberg Cattle

 

It was risky, stealing Abby-dog’s seat riding shotgun with my Farmer for one of these chilly mornings, but I did. Bundled from head to toe, we took on the Kansas cold before the sun was even up. Over the last few years, I’ve found a dear place in my heart for the chunky winter farm-gear that would’ve been considered foreign to me not too long ago 🙂

Cows, on the other hand, are able to withstand great temperature drops and spikes. Still, we like to make sure they are well-cared for and at ease all winter long.

Stroberg cattle are spread out on different fields and pastures close to the farm. Sorted appropriately based on age, weight, gender, etc. and fed accordingly. They graze on crop residue but will need a little something extra when the temperature begins to drop. Same goes with me I think, needing a little something extra when the temperature drops 😉

Although I’ve been told cattle can consume most anything, we actually don’t feed them cookies (sent those with Santa & Co. earlier last week). That would be an example of low-quality forage. These cattle need high-quality forage to keep up with the extra energy needed to maintain body temperature in this sub-zero weather (and, of course, to optimize gut health).

The supplemental hay and alfalfa, mineral and protein is delivered in the morning to give the girls and boys just enough of an energy boost to get them up and grazing by day, rather than retreating behind a wind block (always there for protection though).

Even in the frigid cold, we all need to drink. Cattle tanks are refilled after the ice is broken to keep them well hydrated. There may have been a part of me that was thankful there was only one mallet in the truck, or I’d have had to be a bit more helpful!

 

How much extra energy do they need then, eh?

Research suggests energy needs increase by almost 30%. (There’s a more specific calculation to it, but either way) that’s pounds upon pounds of extra food, and also, more hours spent feeding.

 

So, how did I spend some of the final hours of my first year married?

Outside battling Mother Nature to keep our cattle warm and comfortable this winter.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

2018 will come with many more hours spent in the flatbed rolling out bales, but I look forward to that time. I’ve grown to love our truck and tractor dates, year-round 🙂 Other times, I will continue to enjoy whipping up a family meal. Proud to have a farm-wife life, and I wouldn’t have it any other way!

 

As it goes, “Food is symbolic of love when words are inadequate.” –Alan Wolfelt.

 

Reference: Mullinex, K., Ph.D. (2015, January). Conserving Energy for a Cold Winter– Cattle and Calories. Alabama Cattleman.